The next best thing to going to a Training Mob is seeing what other mobsters are up to and getting motivated to do your next mob! Here's some inspiration - send yours!
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Mar

20


GET THOSE GOALS
When it comes to just about anything in life - including fitness - we all usually have some sense of where we want to be. We see ourselves happy, in love, running 10k in 35 minutes, holding Crow pose - whatever. We know what we want but we tend to get stuck on the road that leads there. That road is paved by goals.
Many people don’t like the idea of goal setting, fearing that it’s too calculated, that it puts too much pressure on ourselves. But goals can actually be really liberating - just ask this guy. They provide us with the focus and the framework we need to have a clear vision of what we want to achieve. Running a 35-minute 10k ain’t gonna happen from the couch. It might not even happen in your first year of running. But with a plan; steady, measurable goals and a little elbow (knee?) grease, it can happen. Same goes for anything else. 

So you mean I actually have to do something?
We’re not even going to dignify that question with an answer – even though we wrote it. What we will do is show you how to set and achieve your goals. You can set measurable, achievable goals in six steps:

1.   Spoilers only suck at the movies. When it comes to setting goals, you have to know the ending before you start. Begin with the end in mind and visualise what you want to achieve. Example: “I’d like to run a half marathon”.
2.   Be specific. “I’d like to run a half marathon” is nice, but let’s add some colour to this picture. “I’d like to run the Malibu Half Marathon” is starting to look a little more enticing, no?
3.   Best before. Give your goal an expiration. For example: “I’d like to run the Malibu Half Marathon on November 11th, 2012”. And now it’s a date.
4.   Stuart Smalley that sh*t. Use positive, active, affirmative language. “I’d like - “… Nope! “I run the Malibu Half Marathon on November 11th, 2012”. Now that’s a goal statement if we ever heard one.
5.   Chunk it out. With the big goal in mind, it’s time to divide and conquer: break it down into measurable chunks. You can’t know if you’re getting closer to your goal if you can’t benchmark it against something. “I will run one extra kilometre per week until I can cover 21km”. Measurable progress is tangible progress.
6.   Know how toddlers always want something NOW? You haven’t changed. Remember those chunks you just outlined? They’re designed so you can act on them in the present and enjoy some wins in the short term. Thinking about goals as something that get done in some far-out distant future almost guarantees that they will stay there. Be here. Now. And those kilometres aren’t going to run themselves. Time for today’s training run!

Living with a sense that you should be headed somewhere but not knowing how to get there is hella depressing. But setting a goal, breaking it down into measurable chunks and approaching it positively turns it into something that, little by little, day by day actually becomes something. And before you know it, it’s November and you’re crossing that finish line by the beach in Malibu. In Crow pose.
Photo credit: Angie Torres on flickr

GET THOSE GOALS

When it comes to just about anything in life - including fitness - we all usually have some sense of where we want to be. We see ourselves happy, in love, running 10k in 35 minutes, holding Crow pose - whatever. We know what we want but we tend to get stuck on the road that leads there. That road is paved by goals.

Many people don’t like the idea of goal setting, fearing that it’s too calculated, that it puts too much pressure on ourselves. But goals can actually be really liberating - just ask this guy. They provide us with the focus and the framework we need to have a clear vision of what we want to achieve. Running a 35-minute 10k ain’t gonna happen from the couch. It might not even happen in your first year of running. But with a plan; steady, measurable goals and a little elbow (knee?) grease, it can happen. Same goes for anything else. 

So you mean I actually have to do something?

We’re not even going to dignify that question with an answer – even though we wrote it. What we will do is show you how to set and achieve your goals. You can set measurable, achievable goals in six steps:

1.   Spoilers only suck at the movies. When it comes to setting goals, you have to know the ending before you start. Begin with the end in mind and visualise what you want to achieve. Example: “I’d like to run a half marathon”.

2.   Be specific. “I’d like to run a half marathon” is nice, but let’s add some colour to this picture. “I’d like to run the Malibu Half Marathon” is starting to look a little more enticing, no?

3.   Best before. Give your goal an expiration. For example: “I’d like to run the Malibu Half Marathon on November 11th, 2012”. And now it’s a date.

4.   Stuart Smalley that sh*t. Use positive, active, affirmative language. “I’d like - “… Nope! “I run the Malibu Half Marathon on November 11th, 2012”. Now that’s a goal statement if we ever heard one.

5.   Chunk it out. With the big goal in mind, it’s time to divide and conquer: break it down into measurable chunks. You can’t know if you’re getting closer to your goal if you can’t benchmark it against something. “I will run one extra kilometre per week until I can cover 21km”. Measurable progress is tangible progress.

6.   Know how toddlers always want something NOW? You haven’t changed. Remember those chunks you just outlined? They’re designed so you can act on them in the present and enjoy some wins in the short term. Thinking about goals as something that get done in some far-out distant future almost guarantees that they will stay there. Be here. Now. And those kilometres aren’t going to run themselves. Time for today’s training run!

Living with a sense that you should be headed somewhere but not knowing how to get there is hella depressing. But setting a goal, breaking it down into measurable chunks and approaching it positively turns it into something that, little by little, day by day actually becomes something. And before you know it, it’s November and you’re crossing that finish line by the beach in Malibu. In Crow pose.

Photo credit: Angie Torres on flickr
Photo

Mar

4


Meet the Guinea Mobster. Our Guinea Mobster is – you guessed it ‘cause we’re original like that – a guinea pig for Training Mobs. The Guinea Mobster is not a fitness professional – hell, she’s not even that fit, frankly. She is the Everymobster: just a regular person who has agreed to take one for the team when it comes to trying out new mobs, new gear, fun events and crazy challenges. We’ll keep her real identity a secret for the moment since she’s still kinda mad at us for roping her into this.
The Guinea Mobster’s first order of business will be to head down to New York City in March to run the NYC Half Marathon. Her challenge? To beat her last half marathon time (Guinea Mobster note: and meet a dashing, yet sassy New Yorker.). Got a challenge for the Guinea Mobster (within reason)? Throwdown to hello@trainingmobs.com and we’ll add it to our list of ways to test her limits. Got a Mobster you’d like to suggest as a backup Guinea Mobster? We’ll accept those too!

Meet the Guinea Mobster. Our Guinea Mobster is – you guessed it ‘cause we’re original like that – a guinea pig for Training Mobs. The Guinea Mobster is not a fitness professional – hell, she’s not even that fit, frankly. She is the Everymobster: just a regular person who has agreed to take one for the team when it comes to trying out new mobs, new gear, fun events and crazy challenges. We’ll keep her real identity a secret for the moment since she’s still kinda mad at us for roping her into this.

The Guinea Mobster’s first order of business will be to head down to New York City in March to run the NYC Half Marathon. Her challenge? To beat her last half marathon time (Guinea Mobster note: and meet a dashing, yet sassy New Yorker.). Got a challenge for the Guinea Mobster (within reason)? Throwdown to hello@trainingmobs.com and we’ll add it to our list of ways to test her limits. Got a Mobster you’d like to suggest as a backup Guinea Mobster? We’ll accept those too!

Video

Feb

28

Nothin’ like runnin’ through fresh pow. A bunch of Montreal Mobsters hit up local landmark Mount Royal every Saturday for an awesome distance run followed by a well-deserved brunch. Even the 20 cm of snow this week didn’t seem to deter them. In fact, it kinda made the run even better. Probably because they were joined by an Aussie who was kid-in-a-toy-store excited to see the white stuff. Thanks Jonas, for reminding us that snowstorms aren’t all shovels and traffic jams. They can be gorgeous if you get out there and enjoy them! Check out the video to see how gorgeous it was up there.
Video

Feb

26

RACE REVIEW: Hypothermic Half-Marathon, Montreal – “Look Ma, I Still Have All My Fingers and Toes!”

Winter running inspires a special kind of devotion. Even some of the most dedicated runners are all like, “Screw this” once the temperature drops, so we have to tip our hats to the participants who turned out for the Hypothermic Half Marathon on February 18. Especially the dude who raced in full Batman garb. Mad respect, brother. Check out what some Mobsters had to say about the race in the video.

The weather was much better than it could have been, with bright sunshine and temperatures flirting with zero degrees Celsius. There was a brisk wind but overall, conditions were about as pleasant as you could ask for in the middle of February.

It wasn’t a huge race, which might have accounted for the relatively calm overall vibe. The crowd of supporters did their best to keep participants’ spirits up, but the course was designed in a seven-kilometre loop that runners and walkers had to circle three times, which made for lots of downtime. From the participants’ perspective, that made for plenty of time to crank up their iPods, set their pace and try not to kill themselves on the ice.

Oh, the ice. The not-so-hidden hazard of winter. Just navigating your driveway can be risky enough between November and March, so you can imagine what it’s like in a little-travelled park. Yak Trax and other types of shoe grip aids helped for runners who had them. The others just had to be extra careful – and judging from the fact that we didn’t see any stretchers, apparently prudence pays off.

The ice didn’t seem to have a huge impact on finish times, though. The first runner sprinted across the finish line at an impressive one hour and 18 minutes and within an hour; the bulk of the racers had joined him.

Entertainment along the course was a little scarce. Aside from sporadic music and a very enthusiastic Training Mobs cheer station; this wasn’t the race to turn to for fireworks.

Overall, if you’re looking for a race to carry you over until spring or just to provide some midwinter incentive to keep training, this is a good one.

And to finish, our breakdown of Rants, Raves and the Rest of it:

Rants:

  • - The black ice: many runners thought the course was insufficiently salted
  • - The windbreaker that came with the race kit was neither functional, nor fashionable; not many people actually wore it on the course

Raves:

  • - Official finish times were available online within three hours of the end of the race, so for the runner eager to see how he or she did, there was no wait
  • - Race started more or less on time, important when it’s cold out!

The Rest of it:

  • - Fees: between $60 and $75, depending on when you registered
  • - What the fees got you: post-race snacks, windbreaker
  • - Race kit pickup: conveniently from the Running Room at Place Ville Marie (downtown), or onsite, race day
  • - Location: Parc Jean-Drapeau. Bit tricky to get to by car; metro / subway was the best bet. Parking was plentiful as was the $16 price tag
  • - Charity: proceeds benefitted Le Phare/The Lighthouse, a charity that provides support and guidance to sick children and their families

We hope you enjoyed this race review. See you at the next event!

Video

Nov

11

Mobster Monday with Steve. Steve’s a member of the Army Reserves, an employee at Bombardier and an all-around fitness junkie. We caught up with Steve at a free “Muscular Endurance” circuit training mob he was leading and found out what he loves most about Training Mobs…

Photoset

Sep

6

'I've never seen so many minimalist running shoes in my life!'. That was my first thought as I arrived at Francois “Flint” Bourdeau’s Barefoot Running mob and saw this pile of colourful shoes which everyone was standing around. Turns out they were a part of the instructional segment of the mob, where Flint (who’s been running barefoot for over 2 years) gave us a solid run down of barefoot thinking and principles, along with advice on how to get started. In short? Start sloooowly and listen to your body: pain = stop. Then we literally ran barefoot around the track for a total of 1.6km. Even those who - like me - had arrived sporting their Vibram FiveFingers, took off our shoes, and put skin to track. Felt great. As we finished up, Flint took some action shots of our running posture to help us see where we could improve. All in all - a very well put together mob and I’m hoping to see more like these!”

Thanks for the post, Jonas

Photoset

Aug

31

Hill sprints. Hill intervals. Running zig-zag up hills. Detecting a common theme? Our running mob this morning started with a 3km warm-up, which finished at Murray Hill in Westmount. Then we did a variety of sprints and intervals running every which way up and down the hill! Props to everyone who came along - beginners to regulars!”

Thanks for the post, Jonas!

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Aug

27

“We love it when Mobsters from other cities join us and today, we had Alison from Calgary, Alberta drop in to our weekly Saturday morning running mob! We took her along the scenic route by the Lachine Canal and enjoyed the perfect morning out that it was. Thanks for joining us, Ali!”
Thanks for the post, Jonas.

We love it when Mobsters from other cities join us and today, we had Alison from Calgary, Alberta drop in to our weekly Saturday morning running mob! We took her along the scenic route by the Lachine Canal and enjoyed the perfect morning out that it was. Thanks for joining us, Ali!”

Thanks for the post, Jonas.

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Aug

24

"BAM! Running Mob: Up Peel St., killer stair workout, 2.2km sprint! ‘Nuff said.”
A short and sweet description of what sounds like a short but tough workout. Thanks Sarah!

"BAM! Running Mob: Up Peel St., killer stair workout, 2.2km sprint! ‘Nuff said.”

A short and sweet description of what sounds like a short but tough workout. Thanks Sarah!

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Aug

23

“We’re a puppy friendly run club and on this outing, we had a canine friend along for our run down to the Lachine Canal! The group split into two with the pace bunnies doing an extra 2k loop in the middle of the run. Then we all re-grouped at the Atwater market and cruised back home”.
Thanks for the post, Jonas!

We’re a puppy friendly run club and on this outing, we had a canine friend along for our run down to the Lachine Canal! The group split into two with the pace bunnies doing an extra 2k loop in the middle of the run. Then we all re-grouped at the Atwater market and cruised back home”.

Thanks for the post, Jonas!